In Support of Un-Common Sense

Andrew M. Codevilla’s article “America’s Ruling Class — And the Perils of Revolution” published in The American Spectator‘s summer issue is quickly becoming well known by many. Rush Limbaugh has recommended it to listeners at least twice. Some have even called it “the Common Sense of our time”.

A couple of weeks ago, Linda discovered the piece and enthusiastically recommended I read it. She waited quite patiently until I finally got the job done. (I don’t know how she waited so patiently, in retrospect.)

From the first read, we believed Codevilla’s article to be the best articulation to date of America’s current state and the root causes. One does not so frequently find so much sense, all in one place. It gives definition to fundamental problems and phenomenon observed by those of us who have been actively engaged in having an impact. For me, it provided some explanations for a number of incongruencies I’ve been mulling for some time.

It is difficult to determine effective actions when there are no definitions or there is lack of clarity.

We intend to analyze and examine “America’s Ruling Class…” in detail, provide primary source materials of support, and expand upon some of its ideas with several goals in mind.

Our first purpose in undertaking this effort is to “do our own homework”. We believe a root cause of America’s troubles is the too-ready acceptance of information by too many people. Too much trust is granted too frequently. What we’ve all come to call mainstream media is no longer employing basic journalistic principles. That is sadly too often the case even from sources “conservatives” consider friendly.

Even when we believe a source to be a good one, we should do our own investigation.

Further, we have some guidance on this idea from a fellow many consider one of the more articulate founders:

“Question with boldness even the existence of a God; because, if there be one, he must more approve of the homage of reason, than that of blind-folded fear.”

– Thomas Jefferson, 1787

We even find Biblical guidance on the matter:

“Now the Bereans were of more noble character than the Thessalonians, for they received the message with great eagerness and examined the Scriptures every day to see if what Paul said was true.”

– Acts 17:11

Paul praised the Bereans for their discernment and thoughtful consideration, praising them as an example to follow. If doing one’s own research and reflection applies to the Word of God, it most assuredly applies to everything else.

In addition to what is noted above, we are performing our analysis here so as to example the idea that sources should be cited. When we are all reading on any website, we should see some references made to original source materials, we should be able to verify the information ourselves.

The second purpose of our examination and analysis is to further explore some of the historical references made with which we are unfamiliar. Most readers are likely to find a few of the references unfamiliar. In any case, the piece is packed with historical references well worth exploring.

The third purpose of our analysis is that we believe it, if proven on as sound a footing as it appears, it could be a basis for formulating action. Our working theory is that it is an important work and one upon which actions may be based. If ever one is going to base action on anything, it requires a thorough examination.

Finally, we believe a well-written, articulate piece such as this should be supported. Expanding upon the piece, we believe, is only likely to enhance it’s credibility and further inform those interested in it. We also believe as many sources as possible, including ourselves, will help to get the broadest audience of Americans to read it.

Our next piece will be an analysis of the first section of Codevilla’s article. In the meantime, if you would like to read the article in its entirety, click HERE.

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